Monday, May 25, 2020

A Practitioner Of Yoga - 1587 Words

Ã…Å¡U 1.15: Like oil in sesame seeds and butter in curds, like water in the river- bed and fire in the fire-drills, so, when one seeks it with truth and austerity, one grasps the self (Ä tman) in the body (Ä tman) - that all- pervading self, which is contained [in the body], like butter in milk. Ã…Å¡U 1.16: That is brahman, the highest objects of the teachings on hidden connections (Upaniá ¹ £ad), an object rooted in austerity and the knowledge of self. BhG 5.28: The sage whose highest path is release, whose sense, mind and insight are controlled, whose anger, fear and longing have†¦show more content†¦BhG 6.13: One is firm, unmoving, holding in the balance the head, the neck And body, looking at the tip of the nose, not looking in any other direction. YS 2.46: Posture should be steady and comfortable. Both, the Ã…Å¡U and BhG are very specific that the head, neck and trunk should be aligned. In contrast, YS is more general in the correct meditating posture description. One reason, as I proposed previously, for that could be that it was accustomed that the guru is present to demonstrate and teach the student the physical postures, or as Bryant suggests: ‘One could also suppose that other extant texts concerned themselves with the specifics of asana [posture].’ While numerous modern yoga traditions, especially in the West, accentuate the attainment of the physical posture as the highest aim of yoga, the old texts treat the physical posture as only a preparation to the body (physically and energetically) to serve the long meditation practice. As BryantShow MoreRelatedThe Between Yoga And Bodybuilding1172 Words   |  5 PagesYoga has many benefits, but few people consider the overlap that exists between yoga and bodybuilding. In truth, the two exercises are more closely connected than many people realize: Both practices focus on improving the human body and, while they might diverge, there are still plenty of exercises and benefits t o be found. As a form of exercise, yoga is fantastic for improving vitality, thanks to its focus on improving postures and creating harmony between the body and mind. It s a great practiceRead MoreFive Points Of Yog Yoga Essay723 Words   |  3 PagesGi Kim PED 109-03 YOGA Carol Ennser November 3, 2014 Five Points of Yoga For this assignment, I thought I would be helpful for me to know about five points of yoga. Swami Vishnudevananda who was born in South India came up with five essential principles of doing yoga. The five points of yoga focused on mental, spiritual, and physical health: proper exercise, proper breathing, proper relaxation, proper diet, and positive thinking and meditation. I think it is important to remind myself aboutRead MoreHealth Campaign Essay958 Words   |  4 Pagesbehavior that was chosen to promote during our campaign was yoga. We encouraged students, staff, and faculty members at Knox College to partake in yoga classes offered by the school in order to reduce stress and target a particular health/illness outcome. The main physical health/illness outcome targeted in this campaign was reduced blood pressure. Yoga is also seen to improve cardiovascular health. We chose to focus on the benefits of yoga to improve blood pressure and cardiovascular health insteadRead MoreThe Effects Of Yoga On The Mind Body Spirit About A Person s Overall Health Status1524 Words   |  7 Pagesliterature on the benefits of yoga show the importance that exists between the mind, body, and spirit. This review conducted shows the significance of link between the mind-body-spirit about a person’s overall health. Diversity in yoga including type, intensity, and duration are what play significant roles in the levels of perceived health benefits in comparison to traditional exercise. Thus, far stress reduction seems to be the most proposed benefit associated with yoga therapy, even though time constraintsRead MoreStress And Its Effects On Health1442 Words   |  6 Pagesways to cope with stress in an appropriate manner and manage the demands of situations that are considered stressful. Yoga is an excellent example of a coping mechanism used to reduce the aversive effects of health. Yoga helps stimulates both the mind and the body in order to achieve a relaxed and positive emotional state, which in turn leads to better mental and physical health. Yoga helps improve the balance of the mind and body by incorporating several relaxation techniques such as stretching, visualizingRead MoreMindfulness, Super Brain Yoga And Square Breathing1331 Words   |  6 PagesMindfulness, Super Brain Yoga and Square Breathing Mindfulness is a yoga practiced used to self-assess for awareness in the present moment (Leland, 2015) When practiced in the moment, mindfulness has been shown to reduce the negative effects of excessive worry, in the moment, and self-doubt (Jennings Jennings, 2013). Mindfulness is an important component of Eastern religions but has been used in schools to help students increase their awareness of their focus and anxieties in an attempt to overcomeRead MoreA Longitudinal Analysis Of Diet Quality Scores981 Words   |  4 Pagesthis type of medicine it is believed that illnesses, injuries, pain, etc. are caused by an imbalance of some sort. For diagnoses the outer body reflects the inner body therefore Chinese medicine practitioners will look at certain parts of the outer body to find what is wrong in the inner body. Practitioners also take into consideration ones diet, environment, emotional and mental health when diagnosing patients. Treatments in Chinese medicine include: acupunc ture, herbal remedies, diet, exercise, andRead MoreThe Different Branches of Yoga Essay750 Words   |  3 PagesThe Different Branches of Yoga In ancient times yoga reffered to as a tree, a living thing with roots, a trunk, branches, blossoms, and fruit. Hatha yoga is one of six branches; the others include raja, karma, bhakti, jnana, and tantra yoga. Each branch have its own characteristics and function represents a particular approach to life. Some people may find one particular branch more better than another. However, it is important to note that involvement in one of theseRead MoreYoga And The Yoga Community1497 Words   |  6 PagesYoga, being one of the most effective self help approaches to life and living, invites me to help ensure that it is being integrated with maximum wisdom related to breathing. This page is about supporting and educating the Yoga community in its quest for superior knowledge and effectiveness about proper breathing. It is our responsibility to alert everyone about this as there are probably millions of students and teachers with an unclear or distorted idea of healthy breathing. Nowadays, you canRead MoreMedical Advice Essay855 Words   |  4 Pagespreferred over drugs and surgery for the relief of back pain. This study recommends the use of acupuncture, massage, and yoga as initial treatment modalities. It says you should only use medications and surgery as a solution if and when these other therapies dont relieve your pain. Many people support this recommendation. They say theyve sought advice and care from practitioners who didnt use drugs. In doing so they found more relief than when they worked with medical doctors. Unfortunately, insurance

Thursday, May 14, 2020

HND Business Human resource management - 5390 Words

Difference between Human Resources and Personnel management (1.1) Personnel Management Personnel Management is essentially an administrative record-keeping function, at the ground level. Personnel Management professionally manages employee’s activities for individual departments for example in Bhs you will have a personal manger for customer services. It is assumed that the outcomes from providing justice and achieving efficiency in the management of personnel activities will result ultimately in achieving organizational success. Human Resource Development – Human resource management is concerned with the Training, promotion development and implementation of people strategies, which are incorporated with business†¦show more content†¦Communication Restricted flow Increased flow 20. Job Design Division of Labour Teamwork AC1.2 The Role of Human Resource Management in Organizations Managers in the Human Resources profession have the essential job of organizing people so that they can effectively perform their job description. Human resources professionals work together to develop employees skills. For example, HR professionals advise managers and supervisors how to assign employees to different roles in the organization, thereby helping the organization adapt successfully to its environment. In a flexible organization, employees are shifted around to different business functions based on business priorities and employee preferences. Human resources professionals also suggest strategies for increasing employee commitment to the organization. This begins with using the recruiting process or matching employees with the right positions according to their qualifications. Human resources management team helps a business develop a competitive advantage, which involves building the ability of the company so it can offer a unique set of goods or services to its customers. They can do this by hiring the right individuals but it’s not just about hiring talent; it is about keeping people and helping them grow and stay committed over the long term. The Human resources team has to identify needs of the employees regarding career goals and workShow MoreRelatedHnd Subject in Nvq 51376 Words   |  6 Pages------------------------------------------------- HND in Business Awarding Body: Edexcel Level: Qcf Level-5 Course Description This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required for success in current and future employment or for progression to an undergraduate degree. It aims to provide an educational foundation for a range of administrative and management careers in business, specialised studies directly relevant to individual vocations and professionsRead MoreCareer Management : Skills And Skills1482 Words   |  6 PagesHow I’m doing Action Career management skills Taking on management course to enhance and develop my management/leadership capacities and skills. I have picked the field of studies I need to build up my career in as an establishment and I have additionally embraced self-managed learning exercises in business. So far I have successfully passed my management units during my HNC and HND course. I have passed the course with good grades but I still wish to improve my management skills further by gettingRead MoreManual Of HND Marketing Planning Fina14769 Words   |  60 PagesHND Business- Unit Manual- Unit 14- Working with and Leading People UNIT MANUAL (STUDY GUIDE) Marketing Planning Unit 19 HND BUSINESS N E NELSON COLLEGE LONDON L S O N C O L L E G E Copy right Author Editor Version Nelson College London Alfred Mbeteh Nazim Uddin V1-August 2013 HND Business- Unit Manual- Unit 14- Working with and Leading People TABLE OF CONTENT Table of content ...........................................................................................................Read More: Critical Analysis of Organisational Structure and Culture in Relation to Business Performance5081 Words   |  21 Pagescultures regard them not as calamities but challenges, and absorb their lessons†¦..† We can hypothesise that ‘underlying culture ‘refers to organisational culture; ‘bad patch’ refers to a period where business performance is low or employees are moving away form the organisational culture resulting in low business performance; ‘Properly regarded, setbacks can be instructive’ means that the organisation can learn from their mistakes and overcoming obstacles, and ‘Enduring cultures’ are cultures that are longRead MoreDeveloping manager3489 Words   |  14 Pagesunderstanding principles and practices of management behaviour, reviewing own potentiality as a prospective mana ger via stimulations and role plays and how to show managerial skills within a business and services context. Then finally, addressing and analysing a real life case study and relating it to the theories learned. PART A-REPORT AND ACTION PLAN: 1.1 (P1) Management theories are an assortment of ideas and rules which aims to present how a business or organization should be managed. ThereforeRead MoreEssay about Tourism and Tourist Destinations1176 Words   |  5 PagesHND Hospitality Management | Unit number and title | Unit 9: Tourist Destinations | Qualification | HND Hospitality Management | Start date | | Deadline | | Assessor | | | | LO1 Understand the scope of key UK and worldwide tourist destinationsLO2 Understand the cultural, social and physical features of tourist destinationsLO3 Understand how the characteristics of destinations affect theirappeal to touristsLO4 Understand issues likely to affect the popularity of tourist destinationsRead MoreHuman Resource Management For Service Industries1675 Words   |  7 PagesLondon College UCK BTEC HND Diploma in Human Resource Management for Service Industries HNHM 109/ HNTT 118:Human Resource Management for Service Industries Analyze the role and purpose of human resource management in a selected service industry. Justify a human resources plan based on an analysis of supply and demand for a selected service industry business Submitted by: Name: Mary Ann Streling Read MoreFree Essay3489 Words   |  14 Pagesbegan from the simple work is keep something for the people whose possession to avoid losing it. On the contrary, the customer must pay money for that service. When this works take the benefits for all of people (keeper and sender). Gradually, the human send the various things such as money, gold†¦ Nowadays, Vietnam is still developing country and the government is always support, improve, develop economy system. Therefore, the government needs the bank which can help them reduce the inflation, theRead More1.1 Identify the Purposes of Different Types of Organizations844 Words   |  4 PagesHuman Resource Management Institute (HRMI) Edexcel BTEC HND in Business – HRM Unit No/Title: Unit 1/Business Environment Unit Code: Y/601/0546 Assignment No: 1/2 Assignment Title: Organization Purpose It’s Environment Grading Opportunities Available Date Set: 7th October , 2012 Due Date: 4th November 2012 Student ID: ______________________ Student Signature: ___________________ Outcomes/Grade Descriptors Achieved (Please Tick) Read MoreExplain the Factors Involved in Planning the Monitoring and Assessment of Work Performance1084 Words   |  5 PagesBTEC Edexcel HNC/HND Business UNIT 14: Working with and Leading People Introduction The following tasks have been designed to guide your work and provide you with opportunities to provide evidence that demonstrates your understanding of working with and leading people. Each task is different and is set within a specific scenario that you need to read carefully. It is important to place your work in the context of a business organisation therefore examples will be required to support your

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Ethics Of Socialized Healthcare - 1443 Words

My group had the ethical topic of socialized healthcare. As I am on the opposing side, my beliefs are that healthcare should not be mandated by the government. It should not be the taxpayers responsibility for paying for the healthcare of those Americans that can’t afford to purchase a healthcare plan. Instead, it should be the Churches responsibility to take care of those that are sick and in need. I believe that having the government force the rich to pay in not an ethical solution. Socialized medicine is what explains a universal system of healthcare. This would mean that medical assistance given, hospital stays, and any care received would be at a minor fee regulated by our government. The price would be determined on how much money is gained from taxes. This ethical debate began around 1947 when the American Medical Association was in encouragement for a universal healthcare system and the current President at the time, Harry S. Truman was opposed to the idea. This began a debate that has become ethical and tiresome in the United States. (Wikipedia 1) Until recently the healthcare debate had subsided. In March of 2010 Obama singed the Affordable healthcare Act. This gave those without healthcare an opportunity to receive care. When looking at this from a Biblical and Theological standpoint we also have to look at this from a deontological standpoint. Reasoning from a deontological standpoint says that the ends does not justify the means. Therefore, theShow MoreRelatedCultural Awareness And Delivery Of Appropriate Care1369 Words   |  6 Pagesethnicity as a child, I mainly identify with this group. Since their migration to various locations in New England; primarily throughout the late eighteen hundreds to early nineteen hundreds, French-Canadians have been recognized for their rigorous work ethics. Many immigrant men, women, and children worked in mills after relocating to the United States of America. The mills, predominantly textile in nature, which the immigrant families worked in presented safety dangers, and often placed workers at riskRead MoreCultural Awareness And Delivery Of Appropriate Care1392 Words   |  6 Pagesas a child, I mainly identify with this group. Since their migration to various locations in New England, primarily throughout the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds, Franco Americans have been recognized for their rigorous work ethics. Many immigrant men, women, and children worked in mills after relocating to the United States of America. The mills, predominantly textile in nature, at which the immigrant families worked in presented safety dangers, and often placed workers atRead MoreCultural Awareness And Delivery Of Appropriate Care1388 Words   |  6 Pagesas a child, I mainly identify with this group. Since their migration to various locations in New England, primarily throughout the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds, French-Canadians have been recognized for their rigorous work ethics. Many immigrant men, women, and children worked in mills after relocating to the United States of America. The mills, predominantly textile in nature, at which the immigrant families worked in presented safety dangers, and often placed workers atRead MoreLeadership And Management Of The Workplace704 Words   |  3 Pagesthe workplace The need for increased diversity and strong women leadership is an issue in today’s healthcare system. The need for gender equality in healthcare system and number of women participating in medical field are recognized. Although women make up a majority of the United States population (50.8 percent), gender leadership gap remains a huge problem in the healthcare system. The healthcare and public health systems in the United States face a number of opportunities and serious challengesRead MoreEssay about Ethical Behavior810 Words   |  4 PagesThe definition of ethical behavior or ethics as a whole is one that eludes many people. There have been many philosophers that have tried to create a set of guidelines that create a code or baseline to a decision. Immanuel Kant is one such person who has created some of the bases that all theories have been based. Kant’s principals or the categorical imperative is the base for the â€Å"Golden Rule†; which is taught to young children. Do on to others, as you would have others do on to you. To quote KantRead MoreBiomedical Ethics Term Paper: Socialized Health Care1278 Words   |  6 PagesAndrei Panait 9758402 PHIL235 November 20, 2012 Biomedical Ethics Term Paper: Socialized Health Care While many countries today have some sort of public health program, their effectiveness is not conclusive and there is undoubtedly a great deal of controversy regarding all aspects of socialized modern health care. In North America but more so in the United States, there is a deep-rooted stigma associated with all things that relate to socialism, most likely due to history and theRead MoreHmo vs. Nhs2081 Words   |  9 PagesHMO vs. NHS HMO (Health Maintenance Organization) and NHS (National Healthcare Service) have been a controversial topic for many years. I watched a movie entitled, â€Å"Sicko.† It is a documentary that was written and directed by Michael Moore. The Documentary investigates the American health system and compares it to the National Healthcare Service in many other parts of the world. One of the countries that have socialized medical care sits directly above the United States. It is Canada. The horrorRead MoreAmerica s Health Care System1342 Words   |  6 Pagesor how little control a person has over their health status? There is a dark stigma among some that truly believes healthcare is a privilege and not a right. People seem to forget that health care is a vital service that touches the lives of millions of Americans at significant and vulnerable times. The United States government is fully capable of implementing a universal healthcare system to improve the overall health of all A mericans. â€Å"Universal health coverage (UHC) means that all people can useRead MoreThe Question Of Ethics And Ethics1394 Words   |  6 PagesWhat exactly does the term â€Å"ethics† mean? When asking this question among several different groups of people, I’m sure all of their answers would be different in many ways, but would all draw the general theme that ethics is somewhat of a study of what is right and what is wrong. This is a mostly correct conclusion, except for the fact that it encompasses not only determining what is right and wrong, but attempting to systemize and defend those ethical positions which one holds. Almost all of theRead MoreHealthcare Systems And The Healthcare System1554 Words   |  7 PagesThe predominant healthcare system problems in America should be conceptualized from the perspectives of the healthcare organization administrators inclusive of the people with business skills as well as healthcare providers. The issue of crisis in healthcare or ganizations is highly complex, and the researcher is mainly focused on unearthing the use of public relations in addressing the complex health crisis events in the United States’ current healthcare system and to offer recommendations for the

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Ghosts 2 Essay Example For Students

Ghosts 2 Essay In his play â€Å"Ghosts†, Ibsen forces the reader to think about his own ideas and believes, as well as those of society and past ages. Symbolism is one technique repeatedly used to portray the author’s ideas through rain, light, fire, the orphanage, Oswald, and through Engstrand himself. The use of religion is also interesting in the way the town people and Pastor Mander uses it. There are many symbols present throughout Ibsen’s work. Rain is used as a symbol of the cleansing of evil and impurities. Outside of Mrs. Alving’s home it remains rainy and stormy until she faces the truth about her husband. The rain washes away the disguises so that the truth may be seen. Generally when this takes place the sun, another symbol, rises, revealing the reality of the situation. Mrs. Alving said, â€Å"And there we are, one and all, so pitifully afraid of the light† (271). All the characters are afraid to face reality, especially Mrs. Alving, represented by t he light. Fire is yet another symbol Ibsen uses. When Oswald comes downstairs with Alving’s pipe, he recalls an incident when he was given a pipe in his youth. Young Oswald smoked until he became sick. This is a foreshadowing of his illness, another sickness caused by careless actions. Another example of fire is seen when the orphanage, built in honor of Alving, is burned (287). The fire creates a symbolism that represents the truth, rising quickly and devouring all illusions. However, when the fire is extinguished, the fantasy world is up in smoke and all that remains are the painful ashes of the past. The orphanage is used as a subtle symbol for the illusion created by Mrs. Alving. The brothel, Captain Alving’s Home, symbolizes the reality of his life. In the end however, the truth is made known about both by the burning of the orphanage (287), and the brothel taking its place. These two actions illustrate the awakening from illusion to reality in the play. Oswald can also be seen as a main symbol. He is ignorant of the truth, giving him a false sense of innocence. He seems to have some power to stand up for his own beliefs, something his mother lacks. Oswald, is used to represent the truth of his situation which is hidden in is past. His illness and his wanting to die illustrate this idea. A final symbol used throughout the play is that of Engstrand. He represents society as a whole. Engstrand has a crippled leg; yet he says about his ethics he has â€Å"two good legs to stand on† (277). Society is very much like this. It seems to be solid and stable but has weak fo undations. Society will never completely heal or lose its flaws, nor will Engstrand. Religion plays a major role in the everyday lives of the townspeople. The members of this community do not have not have the same direct contact with their God as the members of the ancient Greek world, but reach their God through a divine person (Pastor Manders). In this way, the society presented is further away from the Holy Spirit, but closer to the priest. This gave the priest enormous power as he was a â€Å"Pathway to Heaven† for his congregation (265). This may be seen in Pastor Mander’s obsessions of how he is perceived by the people who entrust him. His power is illustrated during his discussion with Mrs. Alving over whether or not the orphanage should be insured or not. â€Å"You see! In town, we have a great many such people. Followers of other denominations. People might very easily come to the conclusion that neither you nor I have sufficient trust in the ordinance of the Higher Power† (254). The orphanage is to be raised in Captain Alving’s honor, yet it’s his own reputation which Manders is worried about. Mrs. Alving’s name is just mentioned to obscure the obvious reason for saying this. This illustrates how the church was used for personal achievements, and not only to reach divine sanctity. The common people’s conduct is also an important is also in important mirror in how the religion permeates the society in this drama. Mrs. Alving has been living on her own, unbounded from society and regulations. She has become a free-thinker, commonly reading books that are not sociably accepted. Manders response to this, reflects the attitude of the time by saying, â€Å"Remember the duty you owe to this orphanage which you decided to found at a time which your attitude towards spiritual matters was quite different from what it is now- as far as I can judge† (253). In the society Ibsen creates, it is not God’s role to judge, but that of Manders and the other members of society. .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .postImageUrl , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:hover , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:visited , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:active { border:0!important; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:active , .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9 .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u46f185c25cddf4cce4bcfd1876dccbd9:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Frees - The Catcher In The Rye Catcher Rye E EssayMany ideas are presented in Ibsen’s play â€Å"Ghosts.† The use of symbolism, such as rain, light, fire, and characters illustrate various concepts involved throughout the play. Religion, and the misconceptual use of it by Manders and society, also illustrates the unusual scenes painted by Ibsen within the play.

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Book Review of the Bottom Billion Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It by Paul Collier

Introduction Going by the scholarly reviews that have been done on the book The Bottom Billion by Paul Collier and the numerous praiseworthy comments that have made on it; this book is undoubtedly a geographically-oriented economic masterpiece worth being given a serious reading.Advertising We will write a custom book review sample on Book Review of the Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It by Paul Collier specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More According to Wolf (2007) of the venerated Financial Times, this book is indeed â€Å"a splendid book† which sheds light on the dark moral challenges that often impede the bottom billion countries from actualizing their economic goals. Stewart (2007) of the Guardian calls it an â€Å"important book† and rallies behind Collier who, in the book, calls for well-performing countries—especially those positioned in the western geographi cal hemisphere of the world—to use their resources in areas like technology to help uplifting the suffering countries. Stewart’s sentiments are echoed by Quinn (2008) who says that the book is a well written masterpiece talking of â€Å"a paradigm shift away from poverty alleviation as a goal of development†. All these strong opinions of the book, from authoritative sources duly qualify the book as an epitome of invaluable information on the nature of economies today (Reinert, 2011). Of course, like many other books, there have been a few scholars who have opined that some places in the book were a bit too obvious (like the nature of poverty in Africa) or exaggerated (like the role of western governments in helping in poverty alleviation). However, in one way or another, even these critics have confessed that, generally speaking, the book is an epitome of resourceful information. It is on the basis of such scholarly arguments that the expansive review, detailed below, is done. Book Summary Who is the author? As glimpsed in the introduction, the Bottom Billion was written by Paul Collier. According to the Centre for the Study of African economies (2010), Paul Collier is an astute Professor of Economics, a revered director for the Centre for the Study of African economies at Oxford University and a widely published author whose several books and articles numerous scholarly genres have received a good number of honorary accolades.Advertising Looking for book review on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More For example, in 1988, he was prized with the Edgar Graham Book Prize for his worthwhile writings in the book Labour and poverty in rural Tanzania: Ujamaa and rural development in the United Republic of Tanzania. In 2008, the Bottom Billion deservedly â€Å"won the Lionel Gelber, Arthur Ross and Corine prizes† typifying how good the book was written (Centre for the Study of African economies, 2010). Even more importantly, between 1998 and 2003, he served as a director of the development research group of the World Bank where he was not only able to conduct many high-profile researches on the geographical nature of economic power across the world but he also accessed several factual statistics and proofs of poverty in the world. As will be explicatively detailed later, working in the World Bank greatly helped in getting valuable information which he later used to validate and support his arguments in the Bottom Billion. As of today, Paul Collier continues to serve his aforementioned roles while he occasionally writes for magazines and newspapers like the Independent, the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Washington Post and the Washington Journal. What is the book about? Essentially, the book talks about why impoverished countries continue to dwindle down in abject poverty despite the international aid and support that they get from wel l-off countries (Batabyal, 2008, p.507-510). In the book, Collier asserts that there is a continued widening gap between the rich and the poor—with a majority of countries being on the poor side of the equation. More specifically, Collier (2007, p.3-15) asserts that whereas most of 5 billion people in the developing world continue to get richer; there is another group of people (especially from Africa and Central Asia) who continually get poorer. This presents the need for fitting solutions to be found for these impoverished countries whose bad economic situation is worsening. In a large section of the book, Collier delves into talking about the root-causes of the problems being faced by these impoverished states. Once a firm background is laid on this issue, Collier then goes ahead and gives an expansive analysis of the effects of the eminent gap widening between the rich and the poor.Advertising We will write a custom book review sample on Book Review of the Bottom Bil lion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It by Paul Collier specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Towards the ending sections of the book, Collier recommends solutions—basing them on his researches as well as studies done by other scholars—and gives a limelight of what can be expected in the future (Da Cruz, 2009, p.201-204). So in summary, it can be said that Collier offers the cause, effects and solutions of people in impoverished countries—which makes his book well-balanced in terms of his content (Mueller, 2007, p.542-546). More importantly, he sends a distress signal to other scholars calling for help in poverty alleviation. As an answer to this call, a good number of scholars have commendably been able to follow in the footsteps of Collier by spotlighting other areas facing similar problems while intermittently offering solutions. Where does the book â€Å"fit† in literature? To a great extent, this book offered a lot of new insightful information into the nature of global poverty—highlighting trends and patterns in various geographical areas. However, taking a closer look at its content, one is bound to realize that the book offers some form of continuity to his previous works—which talked on global poverty and the economic situation in the world. O’Brien (2007) explicates this by saying that Collier’s ideas in this book relies greatly on previous researches that he did with fellow macroeconomic scholars like Anke Hoeffler. This, probably, is the reason why Collier’s ideas on issues like international conflicts, financial aids and the need for help in fragile states, largely, cite previous works done by the likes of Hoeffler (Stewart, 2007). Additionally, it is worth noting that, other than his close associates; the book also borrows heavily from past researchers and studies conducted by other macroeconomists. This is, especially, typified when Collier gives detailed narratives of past economic regimes witnessed in the 1960s and 1970s and the role that such regimes played in paving the way for the current state of affairs. For example, Collier (2007, p.10-30), details how factors like civil wars, colonization, globalization and technological advancements led to shifts in global power.Advertising Looking for book review on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More As a result of such shifts, some countries—especially those in the west who were able to bountifully reap from events like colonization—found themselves in spheres of influence which have, to date, been used to exert control, influence and, occasionally, help to the rather powerless countries (Lipton, 2008, 750-760). Moreover, the book gives a detailed analysis of the present nature of economic events. To this regard, events like the 9/11 bombing is USA and the global impact it had, is also given. Additionally, the current eminence of global catastrophes like floods, diseases and droughts has also been given by Collier to explain the reasons behind the suffering of the bottom billion. Notably, around 2007 when the book was written, there was a looming danger of economic meltdown—which, as we now know, happened in 2008 in form of a global economic crisis. In the book, warnings of an economic down-surge happening, if urgent measures were not taken by the concerned parties, was blatantly give by Collier. It is, therefore, say to say that the book was not only presented valid and candid ideas but it was also written at a perfect time when clear-cut ways of reducing poverty and global economic solutions were direly needed (Quinn, 2008). Once he has detailed the current nature of events, Collier gives a rather prophetic insight of what might happen in the future depending on the positive or negative actions taken as an answer to the past and present nature of economic events across the world (O’Brien, 2007). It therefore goes without saying that, topping the fact that the book offers new economic insights; it admittedly plays a huge role in facilitating literary continuity. In other words, the book offers a connection between the nature of past, present and future nature of economic and geographic events that have shaped poverty across the world. In doing so, he has connected facts, opinions, arguments, notions and ideas from various scho lars—which, in effect, has also facilitated scholarly continuity. In a nutshell, the book is indeed a literary masterpiece—going by the way the author has fittingly joined various works of art to present his timely message to the world. The many follow-up literary works to support Collier’s ideas as well as the accolades the book has won, since it was written, attest to the book’s invaluable nature. What are the main arguments? In essence, several arguments with regards to the nature of poverty—especially in impoverished countries like New Guinea, East Timor and Solomon Islands—have been variably presented in the book. However, in summary, the plight of the bottom billon has been presented in four major categories, commonly termed by Collier as â€Å"traps.† These four traps are succinctly detailed below. Firstly, we have the conflict trap. Here, Collier (2007) states that the prevalence of global conflicts civil wars, coups and inter national acts of terrorism—like the 9/11 bombings—tend to incur large economic costs (p.35-40). For example, in the book, civil wars are estimated to average at a cost of $64 billion each. Resultantly, countries facing such wars are greatly affected economically. On the other hand, countries which openly or secretly support such wars by providing things like ammunition end up benefiting immensely at the expense of their counterparts. Additionally, such conflicts tend to take a long a long time and even after the war; more time is taken to resuscitate the countries to their initial economic position. This makes it very difficult for progress to be sustained—particularly in war-prone countries that go to war easily (Collier, 2007, p.37). A good example here is the Middle East. Secondly, we have the natural resource trap. On normal occasions, countries that lack natural resources are usually said to be more likely to face poverty. Of course this is true based on ex amples of countries in Africa which are not able to do much in alleviating their poverty levels (Collier, 2007, p.40-45). However, Collier presents an intriguingly paradoxical view on the presence of natural resources in a country. According to him, countries that are richly endowed with natural resources tend to find themselves in a worse economic trap than their counterparts. Collier (2007, p.38-53) attributes this paradox on the following reasons: The utilization of useful natural resources can easily lead to a situation whereby a country’s industries become less competitive based on currency valuation that might arise from revenue generated from the resource. The fight for having a lion’s share of the resources can easily lead to conflicts. In democratic countries, the availability of natural resources simply means that governments should not tax its citizen on products and services got from these resources. As a result, citizens are less likely to be keen on dema nding for important checks-and-balance procedures like accountability thus encouraging ills like corruption and misuse of resources—which are recipes for disasters. Thirdly, we have the landlocked with bad neighbors trap. According to Collier (2007, p.53-56), countries that face high poverty levels yet have well-off neighbors can easily find ways of surviving through their neighbors by borrowing or even learning from them. However, for countries that are poor and have poor neighbors, it becomes utterly impossible for any economic progress to take place since they cannot connect with the rest of the world or even learn since their neighbors are just like them. In addition, these poor landlocked countries tend not to have sufficient infrastructure that can help them market the little that they have to the rest of the world. This delinks them from getting any form of help from others thus further paralyzing the chances of progress. Several poor countries in Africa are alleged t o be victims of this trap. Fourthly, and lastly, we have the trap of bad governance in small countries. Principally, bad governance is a factor that affects both small and large countries. However, in small countries, the effect, according to Collier (2007, p.64-78), is bound to worse since the cost of living is normally low which scares-off potential investors. In effect, only the typical labor-intensive work—which is usually less paying—continues to go on while their â€Å"economic masters† enjoy spoils of their hard work. Notably, a large portion of the book explains the intricacies of these four traps detailing their effects and solutions. A critical analysis of these major arguments—particularly with regards to the proposed solutions and what other critics say about them—is given in the section below. Critical Analysis Argumentative and literary Critique of the Book In doing a critical analysis of this book, it is worth to preliminarily note t hat, in spite of stating that there 58 countries that constitute the bottom billion, Collier does not list them. According to him, this name calling and branding might offend the wrong people thus lead to unnecessary conflicts and wars—which are not the intentions of the book (Collier, 2007, p.7). Nevertheless, throughout the book, several countries are used to exemplify the nature of the bottom billion and the economic difficulties they face in their war against poverty. Remarkably, avoiding the giving of a list is duly commendable based on the much tension that was existent at the time the book was written. Any small issue like listing these countries could have easily led to conflict thus worsening the already bad situation at that time. Again, unlike most scholars who just point out problems and stop at that; Collier goes the extra mile and offers applicable recommendations and solutions to the aforementioned traps. For example, in solving the conflict trap, he points out stringent punitive measures should be put in place to punish those who fuel the occurrence of conflicts like civil wars. Additionally, he outlines the crucial role played by some media houses in such conflicts and recommends that, objective journalism should be encouraged so as to guide these media houses in the right path while concomitantly curbing them from overstepping their boundaries (Da Cruz, 2009, p.201-204). With regards to natural resource trap, Collier recommends that the practice of sharing resources should be encouraged across the world. In essence, at no point in time can one country can have everything. This lack, which is normal, can be solved by interrelations by various countries or even across various regions. The forming of the G-8, is given as a good example of positive influence that can be effected from interoperating with others and sharing resources (O’Brien, 2007). Regarding the trap of being landlocked with bad neighbors, the following solutions ar e given: Improvement of economic policies across regions starting from the grassroots of the society where abject poverty is normally eminent Facilitating the construction of proper infrastructure (especially in terms of transport and communication) so as to ease the flow of valuable information and economic resources across region, to be specific, and the world, at large Instituting economic regulations in terms of unchecked geographical endeavors like migration which, if not regulated can easily lead to increased poverty. Finally, with regards to bad governance in small countries, Collier suggests that changes should be primarily made in the governance so as to offer proper guidance to the people. Once this is done, the economic outlook of such countries can be changed through increased transparency standards being instituted, more governmental checks and balances being put in place, liaising with the rest of the world in the bid to get help in form of aids or even better educat ion that can help them develop on their own. Also, collier stresses that the mentality of overdependence on aids from well-off countries should be replaced with a culture that nurtures and encourages the growth of hard work. This way, such countries are able to survive on their own during crisis or in case their donors withdraw their support (Reinert, 2011). These solutions and recommendations presented have been able to greatly help in facilitating economic progress across the world while concurrently alleviating poverty. The GDP of some countries that had been reported as languishing in abject poverty have been able to, reportedly, improve. The wake-up call issued in the book, even to well-performing countries that had started being complacent of their economic strength, has also been able to yield fruits with positive competition being witnessed even in these well-off countries in their bid to perform better (Reinert, 2011). Nevertheless, as earlier mentioned, a good number of cr iticisms have been issued concerning this book. Examples of such criticisms include the following. According to Lipton (2008, 750-760), the book does not have bibliography, as professionally written books should. Instead, it has an incomprehensive list of research which does not clearly indicate sources of information and research detailed in the book. This makes it difficult for adequate follow-up to be done on the book’s contents. Again, the failure of clearly listing the bottom billion, as her later did in his book Wars, Guns and Votes once this had been criticized, is considered as cowardice. If he really wanted to prove his facts and nail his ideas appropriately, Lipton (2008, p.750-760) says that he should have given the bottom billion list. Finally, Collier’s criterion for defining the bottom billion based on their economic stagnation is considered by Lipton (2008, p.750-760) as not being utterly appropriate. In supporting his critique, Lipton says that even tho ugh the countries cited as the bottom billion did, actually, stagnate, a good number of them had respectable â€Å"annual GDP-per-head growth â€Å" between 1975 and 2005. Examples of countries given by Lipton include Equatorial Guinea, Laos, Myanmar, Uganda and Mozambique. Conclusion From the arguments presented herein, it is undeniably clear that the Bottom Billion avails crucial information that was not only relevant in 2007 when it was written but is even vital in solving some of the economic problems being faced today (Reinert, 2011). However, in the process of expressing the ideas in the book, some issues might have been overstated or overlooked thus leading to its criticism. Geographically, several crucial patterns, trends and mannerisms were noted in the book. In solving the nature of poverty in the book, Collier emphasized that apt geographical strategies and initiatives should be put in motion (Mueller, 2007, p.542-546). Commendably, a good number of such strategies are currently underway. Examples here include the realignment of poor landlocked countries such that they are able to interact with those that are developed, the formation of joint regional corporations or even the emphatic agenda placed to maximize the use of natural resources in certain geographical set-ups to help alleviate poverty (O’Brien, 2007). Such initiatives underscore the value of geography in the world. More studies of this kind should, thus, be conducted to not only help in poverty alleviation but also solve the many other problems being faced in the world today. References Batabyal, A. A. (2008). Why the poorest countries are falling and what can be done about it. Journal of Agricultural Environmental Ethics, 21 (5), 507-510. Center for the Study of African Economies. Professor Paul Collier. Web. Collier, P. (2007). The bottom billion: why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it. New York: Oxford University Press. Da Cruz, J. (2009). The bot tom billion. Journal of Third World Studies, 26 (1), 201-204. Lipton, M. (2008). Review article: bottom billion: countries or people? The Journal of Development Studies, 44 (5), 750-60 Mueller, S. (2007). The bottom billion. The International Journal of African Historical Studies, 40 (3), 542-546. O’Brien, T. (2007). The bottom billion: why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it: some insights for the Pacific? Web. Quinn, M. (2008). â€Å"The bottom billion: why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it† by Paul Collier.  Web. Reinert, E. S. (2011). The bottom billion: why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it.  Web. Stewart, H. (2007). Action will speak louder than words. Web. Wolf, M. (2007). How the bottom billion are trapped.  Web. This book review on Book Review of the Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It by Paul Collier was written and submitted by user Eleanor Freeman to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on A Brief History Of Feminism

A Brief History of Feminism Feminism is difficult to define because every woman views feminism differently. â€Å"Generally speaking, feminism is a political, social, and cultural stance that is pro-woman† (Warhol, 1995). Feminists believe, among other things, in equal rights, opportunities and paychecks for men and women. Women are just as worthy and valuable as men and feminists want the world to know it. Before the 1920’s, women had virtually no rights. They could not vote, they could not own property and they were treated with little or no respect. Women were expected to stay at home and take care of their husbands and children. If a woman did choose to work outside of her home, there were few jobs to choose from. Most women worked as clerks, nurses, schoolteachers and other traditionally female occupations. Women began to grow very frustrated and they realized that something had to change. â€Å"Historically speaking, feminism has been associated in the United States with the struggle for women’s political enfranchisement† (Warhol, 1995). The first wave of feminism in the United States occurred in the 1920’s hen women fought for the right to vote. A proposed constitutional amendment was introduced in every session of Congress form 1878 to 1919, but was defeated each time. Finally, in 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment was added to the Constitution giving women equal pay for equal work, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited job discrimination on the basis of gender. The second wave of feminism arose in the 1960’s with the sexual revolution. This wave of feminism is sometimes referred to as Women’s Liberation. This time the movement involved issues of reproductive rights (such as birth control and abortion) as well as equality in the workplace and female representation in the government. Many believe that this wave of feminism is still in place today. To... Free Essays on A Brief History Of Feminism Free Essays on A Brief History Of Feminism A Brief History of Feminism Feminism is difficult to define because every woman views feminism differently. â€Å"Generally speaking, feminism is a political, social, and cultural stance that is pro-woman† (Warhol, 1995). Feminists believe, among other things, in equal rights, opportunities and paychecks for men and women. Women are just as worthy and valuable as men and feminists want the world to know it. Before the 1920’s, women had virtually no rights. They could not vote, they could not own property and they were treated with little or no respect. Women were expected to stay at home and take care of their husbands and children. If a woman did choose to work outside of her home, there were few jobs to choose from. Most women worked as clerks, nurses, schoolteachers and other traditionally female occupations. Women began to grow very frustrated and they realized that something had to change. â€Å"Historically speaking, feminism has been associated in the United States with the struggle for women’s political enfranchisement† (Warhol, 1995). The first wave of feminism in the United States occurred in the 1920’s hen women fought for the right to vote. A proposed constitutional amendment was introduced in every session of Congress form 1878 to 1919, but was defeated each time. Finally, in 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment was added to the Constitution giving women equal pay for equal work, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited job discrimination on the basis of gender. The second wave of feminism arose in the 1960’s with the sexual revolution. This wave of feminism is sometimes referred to as Women’s Liberation. This time the movement involved issues of reproductive rights (such as birth control and abortion) as well as equality in the workplace and female representation in the government. Many believe that this wave of feminism is still in place today. To...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

History Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 69

History - Essay Example The 1960s movement culture had also force a reconsideration of foreign policy concerning defense of democracy and human rights across countries because of liberals seemed to be blind to human rights abuses and dangers of the Soviet military power. To provide evidence that the 1960s movement had led to the development of neo-conservatism politics and worldwide reconsideration of foreign policy, Boyer (2001) stated that America’s prime interest was mainly commerce and missionary work; however, the growth of the Soviet forces had made America a buffer state which balance great power and ambitions and defend only against external threats (283). America were blind to human abuses as they were linked to the British while supporting the Jews. America believed that containment of Soviet threat is necessary and this led the nationalist or neo-conservative movement to emerge. This movement saw that while America promote different social programs, they are still blind to worldwide human rights abuses because of containment of Soviet threat. Based on the evidences, I assumed that the Soviet force was truly terrifying; if not, why would America will only aim towards containment despite seeing worldwide human rights abuses? I learned that to preserve foreign relations, establishing an ally would help a lot. However, we must see to it that the draft of foreign relations policy will not only support social welfare and defense but will also strengthen democracy and protect human rights across the globe. This must promote equality among all